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Vitamin D, sunshine vitamin

09/07/2012

Vitamin D, is sometimes called the sunshine vitamin

Not readily available from food, we rely on sun exposure to make this important vitamin.  So what are we to do when we are getting very little sunshine and it’s July?

Vitamin D is important for a healthy calcium balance, supports the immune system and helps regulate blood pressure.  A healthy level of this vitamin is therefore necessary for preventing osteoporosis, some cancers, autoimmune diseases, hypertention diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Vitamin D is fat soluble, which means we can easily store it, however with lack of sun, our stores are likely to be very low right now.

Foods sources that naturally provide vitamin D3:  Herring, salmon, cod, shrimp, some wild game organ meats, plant sources contain vitamin D2 dark green leafy vegetables

Foods which are fortified with either D3 or D2: Milk, soya and some cereals.

It is possible to have low stores of this vitamin if we don’t get enough sun, use sunscreen everyday, have dark skin or cover up in the sun.  The elderly tend not to go out much and it becomes more difficult to make this vitamin as we grow elder too.  It’s  important to get your levels checked to ensure you have enough, dietary supplements would be recommended if it’s established that you have low levels.

As with all vitamins it’s important to get professional advice before taking dietary supplements, many vitamins and minerals taken in isolation may cause long term deficiencies and imbalances which could lead to other issues.

From → Top tips

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